Diabetes & Endocrinologists

We provide comprehensive care to our patients

Our Endocrinologist Doctors

  • DR ASGHAR NIAZI

    Anesthesiologist

    SpecialityConsultant Anesthesia Doctor

    Education MBBS, FCPS

    Experience

    Timings3pm-9pm (On Call)

    Days OffSunday

    Lynn Lambert

    Cardiology

    Education MD, OB/GYN

    Experience2 years

    OfficeOffice 12b, Hall A

We are proud to have the opportunity to give you the smile of your dreams.

Dr. Farhat Abbas
CEO
Diabetes & Endocrinologists

Endocrinologists can help you manage your diabetes by prescribing insulin and/or medications, offering diet plans and helping you to keep a close watch on your blood glucose levels. Besides diabetes, Endocrinologists also diagnose and treat such issues as: Cushing's disease. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH)

Here At Al-Qaim Hospital

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions, such as:

  • Can you describe your symptoms?
  • Do you have symptoms all the time, or do they come and go?
  • How severe are your symptoms?
  • Do you have a family history of preeclampsia or diabetes?
  • Tell me about your diet.
  • Do you exercise? What type and how much?
    • Diabetes Test On Patient

    • Managing Diabetes:

      • Healthy eating
      • Physical Activity
      • Monitoring your blood sugar
      • Insulin
      • Oral or other medications
      • Transplantation (In Some Cases For Type 1 Diabetes)

    Medical Counseling

    Diabetes Diagnosis

    Symptoms of type 1 diabetes often appear suddenly and are often the reason for checking blood sugar levels. Because symptoms of other types of diabetes and prediabetes come on more gradually or may not be evident, the recommended screening guidelines should be taken. Al-Qaim Hospital recommends that the following people be screened for diabetes:

    1. Anyone with a body mass index higher than 25, regardless of age, who has additional risk factors, such as high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol levels, a sedentary lifestyle, a history of polycystic ovary syndrome or heart disease, and having a close relative with diabetes.

    2. Anyone older than age 45 is advised to receive an initial blood sugar screening, and then, if the results are normal, to be screened every three years thereafter.

    3. Any woman who has had gestational diabetes, is advised to be screened for diabetes every three years.

    4. Anyone who has been diagnosed with prediabetes is advised to be tested every year.

    Tests for type 1 and type 2 diabetes and prediabetes

    Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test, which doesn't require fasting, indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells.

    The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates that you have diabetes. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 percent indicates prediabetes. Below 5.7 is considered normal.

    If the A1C test results aren't consistent, the test isn't available, or you have certain conditions that can make the A1C test inaccurate — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes:

    Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time. Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) — 11.1 millimoles per liter (mmol/L) — or higher suggests diabetes.

    Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes.

    Oral glucose tolerance test. For this test, you fast overnight, and the fasting blood sugar level is measured. Then you drink a sugary liquid, and blood sugar levels are tested periodically for the next two hours.

    A blood sugar level less than 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L) is normal. A reading of more than 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) after two hours indicates diabetes. A reading between 140 and 199 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L and 11.0 mmol/L) indicates prediabetes.

    • If type 1 diabetes is suspected, your urine will be tested to look for the presence of a byproduct produced when muscle and fat tissue are used for energy because the body doesn't have enough insulin to use the available glucose (ketones). Your doctor will also likely run a test to see if you have the destructive immune system cells associated with type 1 diabetes called autoantibodies.

    Type 1 Diabetes

    People with type 1 diabetes need insulin therapy to survive. Many people with type 2 diabetes or gestational diabetes also need insulin therapy.

    Many types of insulin are available, including rapid-acting insulin, long-acting insulin and intermediate options. Depending on your needs, your doctor may prescribe a mixture of insulin types to use throughout the day and night.

    Insulin can't be taken orally to lower blood sugar because stomach enzymes interfere with insulin's action. Often insulin is injected using a fine needle and syringe or an insulin pen — a device that looks like a large ink pen.

    An insulin pump also may be an option. The pump is a device about the size of a cellphone worn on the outside of your body. A tube connects the reservoir of insulin to a catheter that's inserted under the skin of your abdomen.

    Type 2 Diabetes

    Treatment of type 2 diabetes primarily involves lifestyle changes, monitoring of your blood sugar, along with diabetes medications, insulin or both.

    Depending on your treatment plan, you may check and record your blood sugar as many as four times a day or more often if you're taking insulin.

    Careful monitoring is the only way to make sure that your blood sugar level remains within your target range. People with type 2 diabetes who aren't taking insulin generally check their blood sugar much less frequently.

    The most common method to deliver general anesthesia is through inhalation after an initial intravenous (IV) injection. The patient breathes in anesthesia gases that are absorbed by the lungs and delivered via blood stream to the brain and spinal cord.

    A patient who receives general anesthesia is usually under the care of an anesthesiologist, a medical doctor who has completed three years of specialized training in anesthesia beyond medical school. A nurse anesthetist is a specially trained nurse who may also administer general anesthesia, usually under the direct supervision of the anesthesiologist. Under general anesthesia, the anesthesiologist or nurse anesthetist remains with the patient throughout the procedure and carefully checks the patient's heart rate, electrocardiogram, blood pressure and oxygen delivery (pulse oximetry) at a minimum of five-minute intervals.

    Patients typically have amnesia regarding what happened during general anesthesia; only rarely do some patients remember events.

    Primary Number

    All Doctors are on call and you must book an appointment in advanced. Call us now on our primary number.

    Medical Counciling

    Our specialists are always prepared to offer medical advise and counseling for issues concerning the patients.

    For Disable

    Parking and facilities are availble for the disbaled here at Al-Qaim Hospital.

    Heart Specialists

    Our Specialists in heart and chest pains are available on call, please contact us immediately if you have a symptoms of chest pains.

    Qualified & Experienced Doctors

    All our doctors are qualified and certified, we have a range of knowledable doctors with both local and international experience.

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    • Address

      372 Saidpur Rd, Block E Asghar Mall Scheme, Rawalpindi, Punjab, Pakistan.

    • Primary Number

      (+92) 051-4415-671

    • Email contact

      info@alqaimhospital.com

      alqaimhosp@gmail.com

    • Website

      www.alqaimhospital.com